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Canine Diabetes

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Fido's Diabetes Not Like Aunt Rose's:College of Veterinary Medicine:"Like people, pets can get diabetes mellitus, or "sugar diabetes." Animals ranging from horses to pet birds to ferrets can get diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common hormonal disorders in the dog. It is a bit less common in cats. Pets also get another disease called diabetes insipidus, or "water diabetes." For both types of diabetes, your pet will experience an increase in urination and drinking, but for different reasons. In diabetes insipidus, either the body is not making enough of the hormone that tells the kidneys to retain water or the kidneys can’t respond to this hormone. In diabetes mellitus, there is a lack of insulin, a hormone that helps bring glucose into most body cells. “Basically, the body has enough groceries but has no way to deliver them,” explains Dr. Burke. The glucose that should be going to body cells is excreted in the urine; water follows it out, creating more urine and a greater need to urinate."
http://www.cvm.uiuc.edu/petcolumns/showarticle.cfm?id=76

Diabetes in Dogs:vetinfo.com:"taking on the treatment of a dog with diabetes means making a big commitment in time and responsibility to your pet. Not everyone can do this as jobs, other family needs and many other things can interfere with this sort of commitment. Some dogs can be maintained on once daily insulin injections and feeding three fairly equally spaced meals a day. Many dogs require twice daily insulin injections, evenly spaced, with three to four equal meals a day at regular intervals. You have to learn to administer the insulin injections and to help in regulating the insulin levels. This usually involves screening for glucose in the urine or using a glucometer to measure blood glucose levels. Many of our clients have been able to use the blood glucose meters made for home use for their pets. They draw the blood by using the lancet device or with a hypodermic needle. Our clients seem to have the best luck getting blood from the upper lip but some people use the footpad or ear margin"
http://www.vetinfo.com/ddiabt.html#Diabetes

Caninsulin; insulin for dogs:caninediabetes.homestead.com:"Caninsulin is made exclusively for animals, but is not yet available in the United States. It is currently available in Europe, Canada, and Australia from your veterinarian. Intervet is currently in the initial stages of getting government approval for its use in the US. This product however is the same kind of insulin as Lilly's Iletin II porcine mixed insulin zinc suspension (lente), only its more dilute for more accurate dosing in small animals (40iu/ml instead of 100iu/ml). Caninsulin is a lente product, and contains 30% "fast" insulin (semilente) and 70% "slow" insulin (ultralente)"
http://caninediabetes.homestead.com/files/insulin.html

Meet Tylyler a dog with diabetes. contains information on this disease and treatment:weir.net:"Having a diabetic and/or blind animal isn't the end of their life. It changes things, mostly in the beginning. At times you will feel alot of different emotions. Compounded on top of this, you may have remarks made to you concerning your choices for your animal. A diabetic and/or blind animal can enjoy a long, healthy and happy life. From my experience-you actually come to love them more also. Tyler is a fighter and a true gentleman. Throughout, he's never lashed out in pain or fear. This is his story, however, there are other success stories also. I invite you to join the Blind Dog, Muffin and Pet-Diabetes email lists and hear those other stories."
http://www.weir.net/~lglass/

So your pet has been diagnosed with diabetes...:vetmed:"Diabetes in animals is most commonly the acquired form and typically occurs in middle-aged to older pets. The disease results when glucose transport channels on cell membranes are insensitive to the effects of insulin (or when there are too few channels) or when the quantity of insulin produced by the pancreas is inadequate to activate the number of glucose channels needed to maintain normal cellular metabolism. In other words, insulin is the “key” that allows special “gates” for sugar transport across cell membranes to be opened. A diabetic, therefore, has too much glucose in the bloodstream where most of it cannot be utilized, and not enough glucose within the cells themselves, where it is most needed for energy. As a result, cells attempt to derive energy from alternate metabolic pathways, such as fat breakdown."
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/sac/mededu/diabetes/home.html

Diabetes an explanation and current therapies:pressenter.com:"Canine diabetes mellitus (DM) is a relatively common disorder that occurs almost exclusively in the insulin dependent form (IDDM). This article will not discuss the relatively uncommon forms of non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (type II and type III) in the dog. In the cat nonIDDM is quite common and may account for up to 40% of the disease. The disease is a result of insufficient insulin production from the pancreas. Beta islet cells in the pancreas which are responsible for the production of insulin are destroyed over time. There are probably many reasons for beta islet cell destruction and subsequent hypoinsulinemia (low blood insulin). Known causes include diseases stressing the pancreas: pancreatitis, cushing¹s, acromegaly and progesterone drugs. Clearly some individuals are genetically predisposed to the disease but there is no breed predilection. It is also believed that infection and chronic small bowel inflammation may induce DM."
http://www.pressenter.com/~dvmvis/candiabetes.htm

Diabetes Mellitus in the dog :vet2pet.com:"Diabetes Mellitus is a disease, which prevents your dog from turning sugar (glucose) in its diet into energy. This is due to the lack of insulin, excreted by an internal organ known as the pancreas. Insulin, which is excreted by the endocrine mechanism of the pancreas, controls blood glucose levels. In the diabetic animal, the blood glucose level is too high, and sugar is excreted in the urine. If the blood sugar level is not stabilised and maintained at a normal level, the body will start to break down it's own tissues to obtain energy. What are the signs that my dog has diabetes? The common clinical signs are: Increased urine production, increases drinking, weight loss despite having a healthy appetite, listlessness and sometimes the breath may smell sweet"
http://www.vet-2-pet.com/diabetesmellitus.html

An introduction to canine diabetes:petz.co.uk:"Often an owner will come into the surgery complaining that their dog has suddenly started wetting in the house. Often it is a very well trained, older dog, and this behaviour is quite out of character. On further questioning it may turn out that the pet has been drinking rather more water than used to be the case. There may be some loss of weight. Another old fashioned term for sugar diabetes was" starvation in the midst of plenty". This was meant to describe the fact that the blood sugar level was very high, yet for some reason the body was unable to utilise that glucose resource. The cause of this "starvation" we then discovered to be a lack of the hormone insulin. Damage to specific clusters of cells in the pancreas, which release the insulin, is indeed the root cause of this sad condition. Nevertheless, both in dogs and in cats, diabetes mellitus is quite treatable nowadays."
http://www.petz.co.uk/vetontheweb/new/article8.html

Animals are very similar to humans:vetstop.com:"Animals are very similar to humans in a number of ways, including some of the medical conditions we see. Diabetes in dogs is very similar to the form of diabetes seen in children. This form is responsive to Insulin which is different from the form seen in older adults. What is it? In most dogs it means a deficiency of Insulin. Insulin is needed by all cells to allow glucose to enter them to be used as an energy source. When glucose can’t enter the cells the levels in the blood rise and stay high leading to a myriad of problems. Clinical signs• Excess drinking & urinating because when the high levels of glucose are excreted in the urine they take water with them.• Weight loss because when the cells can’t use glucose for energy so they start to metabolise the body’s fat stores.• Excess eating because glucose can’t enter the cells in the brain which regulate appetite"
http://www.vetstop.com.au/Info/DMCanine.htm

Some people with diabetes take oral medication. Is this true for dogs?:ahop.cnchost.com:"In humans, two types of diabetes mellitus have been discovered. Both types are similar in that there is a failure to regulate blood sugar, but the basic mechanisms of disease differ somewhat between the two groups. Type I, or Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus, results from total or near-complete destruction of the beta-cells. This is the only type of diabetes known in dogs. As the name implies, dogs with this type of diabetes require insulin injections to stabilize blood sugar. Type II, or Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus, is different because some insulin-producing cells remain. However, the amount produced is insufficient, there is a delayed response in secreting it, and the tissues of the dogs body are relatively resistant to it. People with this form may be treated with an oral drug that stimulates the remaining functional cells to produce or release insulin in an adequate amount to normalize blood sugar. Because Type II diabetes does not occur in dogs, oral medications are not appropriate for treating diabetic dogs."
http://www.ahop.cnchost.com/Guide/Candiabe.htm



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Amputation:
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Associations:
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Atherosclerosis:
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Camps For Diabetic Kids, Children With Diabetes:
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Canine Diabetes:
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Cataracts:
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Cause of Diabetes:
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Charcot Foot:
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Complications of Diabetes:
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Diagnosing diabetes:
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Dialysis and diabetes:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/dialysis/

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Diet for the diabetic:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/diet/

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Dyslipidemia:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/dyslipidemia/

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Educator (Diabetic Educator):
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/educator/

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Eye (Diabetic Eye Disease):
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/eyedisease/

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Feline diabetes:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/feline/

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Gestational diabetes:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/gestation/

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Glaucoma:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/glaucoma/

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Hyperglycemia:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/hyperglycemia/

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Hypoglycemia:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/hypoglycemia/

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IGT (Impaired glucose tolerance):
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/IGT/

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Insipidus (diabetes insipidus):
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/insipidus/

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Ketoacidosis (diabetic ketoacidosis):
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/keto/

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Kidney Transplant:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/transplant/

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Kids and diabetes:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/kids/

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Management of diabetes:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/management/

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Men and diabetes:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/men/

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Nephropathy:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/nephropathy/

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Neuropathy:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/neuropathy/

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Prevention of diabetes:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/prevention/

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Research:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/research/

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Retinopathy:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/retinopathy/

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Symptoms of diabetes:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/symptoms/

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Traveling and diabetes:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/traveling/

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Treatment of Diabetes:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/diabetestx/

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Type 1 diabetes/ IDDM:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/type1/

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Type 2 diabetes/ NIDDM:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/type2/

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Ulcer (diabetic ulcer):
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/ulcer/

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Women and diabetes:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/women/

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Diabetic Medications:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/medications/

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Last updated by Andrew Lopez, RN on Wednesday, September 29, 2010


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