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Guide to Feline Diabetes:felinediabetes.com:"FelineDiabetes.com acts as a clearinghouse for information about diabetes in cats. This guide provides introductory information about the disease and its treatment, along with a message board for questions, extensive links, photo gallery, and the "Diary of a Diabetic Cat." This site is by and for cat owners"
http://www.felinediabetes.com/

Living With Feline Diabetes:netpets:"Not many cat owners would greet the news that their cats are diabetic with sangfroid. That diagnosis does carry a life sentence of needles and injections, and, to most owners' way of thinking, eventually devolves into worsening symptoms and dead-end complications. Mosette Eibert is an exception to that rule. When Eibert learned that her pudgy, 13-year-old domestic longhair, Perry, had diabetes, her response was immediate. "I was so happy," she says. "I was glad that's what it was." Eibert, a veterinarian, specialized in feline medicine while serving her residency at Kansas State University. Thus, she understood that Perry's symptoms--which included a compelling thirst, frequent urination, and weight loss---could have spelled life-threatening disease in capital-punishment letters. Moreover, she already knew several heartening facts about feline diabetes: The prognosis for diabetic cats is generally good. Feline diabetes is usually manageable; and diabetic cats do not suffer blindness, circulatory problems, or other complications that human diabetics do"
http://www.netpets.com/cats/reference/diabetes.html

PREVENTING OBESITY MAY REDUCE RISK OF DIABETES IN FELINES:K-State News Release:"When it comes to reducing the risk of diabetes, what's good for the goose is good for the gander. Or in this case, what's good for the cat owner is also good for the cat. What's good for both is exercise and a proper diet, according to a Kansas State University veterinarian. Just as in people, the disease in cats -- diabetes mellitus -- is characterized by an impaired tolerance of carbohydrates, proteins and fat -- either because of an absolute or relative deficiency of insulin, said Kenneth Harkin, assistant professor of clinical sciences at K-State's College of Veterinary Medicine. While Harkin doubts that there is any single mechanism that can avert diabetes, preventing obesity is "a good idea for any pet" and worth a pound of cure."
http://www.newss.ksu.edu/WEB/News/NewsReleases/listdiabetes11248.html

Diabetes is an endocrine disorder seen not only in humans but cats too:cats.about.com:"Diabetes mellitus ("sugar" diabetes) is a complex and common endocrine disorder in the cat. It is caused either by insufficient production of the hormone, insulin, by the pancreas (type 1 diabetes) or by inadequate response of the body's cells to insulin (type 2 diabetes). Because diabetic cats are not able to utilize glucose properly, they ultimately develop hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels) and subsequent glucosuria (sugar in the urine). The glucosuria leads to polyuria (excessive urination) and polydipsia (excessive thirst). In spite of maintaining a good appetite, diabetic cats lose weight because the body's tissues are unable to utilize glucose properly. Progression of the disease ultimately leads to further metabolic disturbances and causes vomiting, loss of appetite, weakness, and dehydration. Although affecting cats of any breed, sex, or age, diabetes mellitus most often occurs in older, obese individuals; males are more commonly afflicted than females. The exact cause of the disease in cats is not known, although genetic predisposition, obesity, pancreatic disease, hormonal imbalances, and certain medications have all been incriminated"
http://cats.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http%3A%2F%2Fweb.vet.cornell.edu%2FPublic%2FFHC%2Fdiabetes.html

Living With Feline Diabetes:netpets:"Diabetes results from the pancreas' inability to produce adequate amounts of insulin, a hormone especially important for metabolizing carbohydrates. The chief signs of diabetes are increased drinking, increased urination, and weight loss. "When food is digested," explains Michael Henson, D.V.M., "it's broken down into basics such as sugars and amino acids, which are then absorbed into the bloodstream." Insulin is needed for transporting basic food substances, particularly sugar or glucose, into body cells, says Henson, a resident in internal medicine and a feline-diabetes researcher at the University of Minnesota. The body uses sugar for energy, growth, and repair. What's more, sugar opens the cells' gates so that glucose can move from the bloodstream into tissue cells where it's needed--in muscles, for example. Without enough insulin, glucose accumulates in the bloodstream. Because it cannot move into the tissues where its presence is required, it is lost in urine. Body water is lost in urine, too. Consequently diabetics produce a large volume of urine. This, in turn, "causes changes in urinary habits," says Henson. "Cats urinate more frequently, or they urinate outside the litterbox. The high urine output also increases thirst." Although blood-glucose levels are excessively high in diabetic cats, their tissues are starving for energy because glucose cannot get into their cells. As a result, diabetic cats usually lose weight"
http://www.netpets.org/cats/healthspa/diabetes.html

Cats develop diabetes more often than other mammals:raprice:"At this site, read about Austin whose development of diabetes was the inspiration for the site. Austin has since passed on to the Rainbow Bridge but he left behind another protege with diabetes, Miss Ripley. She's not so outgoing but keeps the site active. Readers may post messages, learn injection and home glucose monitoring techniques, read the latest diabetes news, find addresses of others who have diabetic cats, and explore links to other sites concerning diabetes. Come visit, learn and contribute"
http://members.tripod.com/~raprice/webmaster.htm

Diabetes in cats:bestfriends.org:"Diabetes can occur in cats of any age, though most are over six-years old. Some cats can be insulin dependent and can be helped by life-long insulin therapy. Other cats can be non-insulin dependent and only require insulin when stressed. Typically, these cats regain their balance once the stressful event is over. History and Physical Examination The common signs of diabetes are increased thirst and urination, along with increased appetite and weight loss. However, these signs can be masked in cats that have other illnesses. You may see signs of illness, such as vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, breathing difficulties, weakness, and straining to urinate. These symptoms can appear suddenly, over a few days, or over several months."
http://www.bestfriends.org/members/health/feldiabetes.htm

Diabetes is a very complex condition in cats:sniksnak.com:"A cat's blood glucose levels are controlled by the homone insulin. This is produced by his pancreas, or the body becomes resistant to insulin - somtimes as a consequence of obesity. The disease appears to be most common in cats over six years old and in males, particularly those who have been neutered. Certain breeds may be more at risk than others, but evidence of this is still unclear. Obesity is also considered to be a factor, although it's precise role in this condition is not yet clear either."
http://www.sniksnak.com/cathealth/diabetes.html

DIABETES MELLITUS IN CATS:animalclinic.com:"The role of insulin is much like that of a gatekeeper: it stands at the surface of body cells and opens the door, allowing glucose to leave the blood stream pass inside the cells. Glucose is a vital substance that provides much of the energy needed for life, and it must work inside the cells. Without an adequate amount of insulin, glucose in unable to get into the cells. It accumulates in the blood, setting in motion a series of events which can ultimately prove fatal. When insulin is deficient, the cells become starved for a source of energy. In response to this, the body starts breaking down stores of fat and protein to use as alternative energy sources. As a consequence, the cat eats more; thus, we have weight loss in a cat with a ravenous appetite. The body tries to eliminate the excess glucose by eliminating it in the urine. However, glucose (blood sugar) attracts water; thus, urine glucose takes with it large quantities of the body's fluids, resulting in the production of a large amount of urine. To avoid dehydration, the cat drinks more and more water. Thus, we have the four classical signs of diabetes"
http://www.animalclinic.com/diabetes.htm

Your cat is as likely as a human being to develop diabetes if he or she is overweight.:allourpets.com:"If your cat or dog is overweight and exhibits any of the following behaviors - drinking copious amounts of water, excessive urination, unusual fatigue or listlessness - a visit to the veterinarian is in order. While these symptoms may indicate a variety of illnesses, a few simple blood tests can generally pinpoint the cause and thus define the treatment. When I returned from a vacation in Chile last year to learn that Basil, my 12-year-old Siamese-Himalayan, was at the animal hospital I was both alarmed and thankful. Thankful that my very responsible housesitter had taken him to the emergency clinic when he appeared to be passing out on top of his water dish. The symptoms she described could have indicated kidney failure, liver failure, hyperthyroidism, or diabetes. The presence of a very high level of glucose in his blood immediately indicated that he was diabetic, and he responded quickly to a dose of insulin."
http://www.allourpets.com/index.html



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Educator (Diabetic Educator):
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Eye (Diabetic Eye Disease):
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Feline diabetes:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/feline/

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Gestational diabetes:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/gestation/

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Glaucoma:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/glaucoma/

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Hyperglycemia:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/hyperglycemia/

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Hypoglycemia:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/hypoglycemia/

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IGT (Impaired glucose tolerance):
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/IGT/

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Insipidus (diabetes insipidus):
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/insipidus/

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Ketoacidosis (diabetic ketoacidosis):
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/keto/

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Kidney Transplant:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/transplant/

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Kids and diabetes:
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Nephropathy:
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Prevention of diabetes:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/prevention/

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Research:
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Retinopathy:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/retinopathy/

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Symptoms of diabetes:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/symptoms/

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Traveling and diabetes:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/traveling/

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Treatment of Diabetes:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/diabetestx/

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Type 1 diabetes/ IDDM:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/type1/

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Type 2 diabetes/ NIDDM:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/type2/

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Ulcer (diabetic ulcer):
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/ulcer/

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Women and diabetes:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/women/

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Diabetic Medications:
http://www.nursingdiabetics.com/medications/

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Last updated by Andrew Lopez, RN on Wednesday, September 29, 2010


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