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Hypoglycemia-Comprehensive information on a problem common to diabetics:Content Health:"Glucose, a form of sugar, is the body's main fuel. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, occurs when blood levels of glucose drop too low to fuel the body's activity. Carbohydrates (sugars and starches) are the body's main dietary sources of glucose. During digestion, the glucose is absorbed into the blood stream (hence the term "blood sugar"), which carries it to every cell in the body. Unused glucose is stored in the liver as glycogen. Hypoglycemia can occur as a complication of diabetes, as a condition in itself, or in association with other disorders."
http://content.health.msn.com/content/article/1680.51025

Hypoglycemia-comprehensive review:National Diabetes Information Center:"A person with hypoglycemia may feel weak, drowsy, confused, hungry, and dizzy. Paleness, headache, irritability, trembling, sweating, rapid heart beat, and a cold, clammy feeling are also signs of low blood sugar. In severe cases, a person can lose consciousness and even lapse into a coma. The symptoms associated with hypoglycemia are sometimes mistaken for symptoms caused by conditions not related to blood sugar. For example, unusual stress and anxiety can cause excess production of catecholamines, resulting in symptoms similar to those caused by hypoglycemia but having no relation to blood sugar levels."
http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health/diabetes/pubs/hypo/hypo.htm

Hypoglycemia-comprehensive information including helpful supplements:mothernature.com:"Nutritional supplements that may be helpful: Research has shown that supplementing with chromium (200 mcg per day)13 or magnesium (340 mg per day)14 can prevent blood sugar levels from falling excessively in people with hypoglycemia. Niacinamide (vitamin B3) has also been found to be helpful for hypoglycemic people.15 Other nutrients, including vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc, copper, manganese, and vitamin B6, may help control blood sugar levels in diabetics.16 Since there are similarities in the way the body regulates high and low blood sugar levels, these nutrients might be helpful for hypoglycemia as well, although the amounts needed for that purpose are not known."
http://library.mothernature.com/index.cfm?page=detail&ContentID=1034003

What is reactive hypoglycemia?:Indiana University Health Center:"Reactive hypoglycemia can occur when blood glucose falls, resources of glucose from the liver are exhausted and an individual chooses not to eat. Gradually the body adjusts to this situation by using muscle protein to feed glucose to brain cells and fat to fuel the other body cells. But before this adjustment takes place an individual may experience symptoms of glucose deprivation to the brain resulting in symptoms such as: anxiety, hunger, dizziness, weakness, shaking muscles and racing heart. Because these symptoms are common to many conditions a health care provider should be consulted to assess an individual's specific symptoms and concerns"
http://www.indiana.edu/~health/hypogly.html
Indiana University Health Center 600 N Jordan Bloomington IN 47405 812-855-4011

Pediatric Hypoglycemia:emedicine.com:"In children and neonates, a blood glucose value below 40 mg/dL represents hypoglycemia. Patients with hypoglycemia may be asymptomatic or may present with severe central nervous system (CNS) and cardiopulmonary disturbances. Any acutely ill child should be evaluated for hypoglycemia, especially when history reveals diminished oral intake. Sustained or repetitive hypoglycemia in infants and children has a major impact on normal brain development and function. There is evidence that hypoxemia and ischemia potentiate hypoglycemia, causing brain damage that may permanently impair neurologic development. Causes of hypoglycemia in neonates differ slightly from the causes of hypoglycemia in older infants and children. Hyperinsulinism is the most common cause of hypoglycemia in the first 3 months of life. It is well recognized in infants of diabetic mothers."
http://www.emedicine.com/emerg/topic384.htm

Questions and answers about Hypoglycemia:dietitian.com:"have been diagnosed with hypoglycemia. My doctor put me on a diet that did not seem to work well (high carbohydrate). Recently, I have consulted a Registered Dietitian who has put me on a strict regimen to get some baseline results. She has put me on a no-sugar, hi-protein, low carbohydrate diet (no wheat products, pasta or rice; eating lots of seeds and nuts, vegetables, protein; eating fats-butter or oil with starches such as quinoa, amaranth, millet, potatoes, etc.). I'm wondering if this is a good way to start, because I am frustrated with the limited food choices I have. Also, she has told me that planning to get pregnant until the problem is brought under control may be a bad idea. Can you give me any insight into these issues?"
http://www.dietitian.com/hypoglyc.html

Causes of Hypoglycemia:Mayo Clinic:"Among the underlying causes of hypoglycemia are certain medications, alcohol, certain cancers, critical illnesses including kidney, liver or heart failure, hormonal deficiencies, and disorders that result in your body producing too much insulin. Insulin is the hormone secreted by your pancreas that regulates your level of blood sugar"
contact Mayo Clinic
http://www.mayoclinic.com/findinformation/diseasesandconditions/invoke.cfm?id=DS00198&

Treatment of Hypoglycemia:nutrimed.com:"An absolute must: eliminate all concentrated carbohydrates as refined sugars, etc., and even all natural sugars until the condition is under control. No food or drink containing caffeine can be allowed. The combination of refined sugar and caffeine is particularly devastating and cannot be tolerated. Efforts must also be made to reduce or eliminate all stress and in particular emotional stress. The diet must be natural, fresh and at least 50 percent raw. It should consist of meat, fish, eggs, cheese, fowl, and wild game if desired. Fresh vegetables, especially organically-grown and raw, are most desirable. Eat three meals a day with a protein snack between meals. This really adds up to six meals a day, each one about medium in amount with no overeating at any time. The hypoglycemic must have food every two hours during the waking day. Concentrated natural supplements are essential in all cases, especially raw glandular extracts"
http://www.nutrimed.com/HYPOG.HTM

Hypoglycemia and diet:Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine:"The best way to control hypoglycemia is through a diet similar to that used to control diabetes mellitus: a reduction in simple sugars, a large intake of complex carbohydrates, and frequent feedings. Candy, sodas, and even fruit juices (which manufacturers often sweeten with lots of sugar) are all high in sugar and should be avoided. Foods that are high in soluble dietary fiber slow carbohydrate absorption and help to prevent swings in blood sugar levels. For some, fruits may also be a good addition as fructose -- the natural sugar in most fruits -- does not require insulin to be absorbed into the body cells"
For more information, contact:
Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine
P.O. Box 6322
Washington, DC 20015
(202) 686-2210
http://pyne.kinfolk.org/rbp2/hypo.html

Hypoglycemia treatment:fred.net:"If you are like most sufferers of hypoglycemia, you have at this point seen at least two or three doctors and all of them tell you that nothing is wrong with you, that you are in perfect health. You feel like telling your doctor, "If I am so healthy, why do I feel so bad?" The basic problem is that the medical establishment does not recognize all of the manifestations of hypoglycemia. The generally accepted definition is that your blood glucose level has to drop below 50 mg per 100 ml in order for you to be deemed to have hypoglycemia. I was once told by an endocrinologist that I did not have hypoglycemia. He told me that he saw a lot of people like me, and that they did not have hypoglycemia either. I asked him that if so many people had similar symptoms, didn't that show that there was something there that needed to be investigated. That was about the point that he quit listening to me"
http://www.fred.net/slowup/hypotret.html

Effects of Repeated Hypoglycemia on Cognitive Function:Diabetes Care:"OBJECTIVE -- To test the conclusion that there is no association between multiple episodes of severe hypoglycemia and cognitive decrements by reanalyzing the data from the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) with psychometrically validated cognitive factors and to conduct a novel analysis of the association between individual differences in baseline cognitive ability and episodes of severe hypoglycemia documented after baseline."
http://www.findarticles.com/cf_dls/m0CUH/8_22/56534995/p1/article.jhtml
See also:Nocturnal hypoglycemia in children with type 1 diabetes: American Family Physician




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Last updated by Andrew Lopez, RN on Wednesday, September 29, 2010


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